Ferries – PCCMPH http://pccmph.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pccmph.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Ferries – PCCMPH http://pccmph.com/ 32 32 New ferries are hiring, new ships are delayed https://pccmph.com/new-ferries-are-hiring-new-ships-are-delayed/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://pccmph.com/new-ferries-are-hiring-new-ships-are-delayed/

As service continues to pour in due to the lack of crew, locals are paying close attention to the Washington State ferry service.

Islanders made up about a third of attendees at the WSF’s online public meeting on June 15.

“We have hired 137 crew members since October,” said Steve Nevey, marine operations manager.

To attract new employees, WSF is now budgeted to hire for the year, rather than seasonally, a move that appears to have helped. However, Nevey warned that even more crew is needed and that it will take until the summer of 2023 for some routes to return to normal.

Currently there are 174 licensed deck crew and a total of 200 are required. That may not seem like a lot of vacancies, however, Nevey explained that licensing can take six to eight months. This is true even if the employee already works in the maritime industry.

Jim Corenman, chairman of the San Juan County Ferry Advisory Committee, explained that to get their piloting, the WSF must be able to draw a memory map of all ferry routes and terminals in Puget Sound.

Classes are currently underway, Nevey said, with more planned. To alleviate some of the stress and make it easier to obtain the necessary licenses, the Washington State Legislature provided funding to the WSF for a variety of new programs.

A new program allows the ferry service to sponsor employees who lack the funds to obtain credentials. Another program helps parents keep their children.

According to Patty Rubstello, assistant secretary of ferries for Washington state, the state has historically not provided enough funding to the WSF, but lawmakers have better funded the ferry system this year. She thanked lawmakers and 40th District Sen. Liz Lovelett in particular for her role in passing a budget with additional ferry funds.

“But there is still a lot to do,” Rubstello said.

The ferry service also lacks ships. The fleet consists of 21 boats and five more are needed, especially since the Tillikum is in need of major repairs. The Yakima and Kaleetan also need maintenance.

Under state law, WSF must contract with a boat building company in Washington state, according to Corenman, unless she can find someone who will complete the project within five percent of the schedule. estimated cost.

In the past, WSF contracted with a company called Vigor. He was hired to design the new boats, which the company did. When it came time to build the boats, Vigor wanted more than WSF offered. As a result, the ferry service is now looking for a new builder. Corenman explained that the state uses a cost provided by a private contractor. If they can’t find someone who is within five percent of the state’s estimated cost, the WSF may look for companies from other states, so one way or another, the boats will be built, Corenman said.

However, this is delaying the project and WSF now expects the five new boats will not be completed until mid-2027.

Due to both crewing issues and the delay of new ships, the Anacortes Sydney route is not expected to return until summer 2023 at the earliest, according to Corenman. He explained that after the retirement of the Elwa, the Chelan became the only boat certified for international voyages. While the Chelan is in good condition, having a second boat available in case of an emergency is ideal. Once the new ferries arrive, one of the Olympic-class boats can be certified for backup.

In the meantime, Corenman encourages the community to continue to be kind to workers who show up. They are working hard, high season is approaching and frustrations are running high, he said.

“The good news is that the ferries will support training and help people who want to progress and advance their position,” Corenman said. “Ferry County Advisory Committees are encouraged by management that they [WSF] go, but we are also afraid that it will take time.

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False Creek Ferries celebrates 40 years in business https://pccmph.com/false-creek-ferries-celebrates-40-years-in-business/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 16:06:57 +0000 https://pccmph.com/false-creek-ferries-celebrates-40-years-in-business/

False Creek Ferries is a civic treasure. Getting out on the water for a few minutes changes your day, allowing passengers to slow down and relax from the hubbub of everyday life.

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They don’t go very fast, don’t carry many people, and their journey is over before you know it.

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But for many Vancouverites and tourists, the False Creek Ferries are a civic treasure. Getting out on the water for a few minutes changes your day, allowing passengers to slow down and relax from the hubbub of everyday life.

“It’s very calming,” said Jeremy Patterson, director of ferry operations. “You disconnect from your phone and focus on the environment.”

This year marks the 40e anniversary that George McInnis and his family took over the ferries. So on July 1, the False Creek Ferry fleet will be celebrating with a special “Ferry Ballet” in False Creek from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Synchronized maneuvers include classics like the “Flying V”, “Figure Eight” and “Circle of Death”.

Patterson explains the latter.

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“We make two concentric circles, one inside the other,” he said. “A clockwise turn, a counter-clockwise turn, with a series of ferries. Then we burst simultaneously – everyone makes a sudden turn, like a firework.

Ferries have been doing the ferry ballet on special occasions for decades, usually just before the Celebration of Light fireworks.

“A guy would kind of draw it on paper, come down and hand us a sheet,” he says.

“We look at it and we’d say ‘OK, I think I know what it means’ and we try it. We all have radios on the boats, so one person would say ‘OK, we’ll perform this maneuver in five-four-three-two-one” and then it happens.

The service began in the summer of 1981, when Brian Beesley and Laura Gibson ordered four small electric ferries and began taking people around False Creek for 50 cents.

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Unfortunately, they ran into financial trouble and McInnis purchased the fleet. In 1985 his former partner Jeff Pratt left to start a rival ferry, the Aquabus.

Today both companies operate fleets (False Creek Ferries has 17 boats, Aquabus has 14) in and around False Creek. But business has been tough during the pandemic.

“We were closed for three months,” Patterson said.

“Our business was down over 90%, and progress was slow from there. But we’re busier now than we’ve ever been.

In fact, False Creek Ferries just had its busiest May ever with around 120,000 passengers. The record would be around 250,000 in one month, in July or August.

Patterson started working for False Creek Ferries as a summer job in 1990. He tried other maritime gigs, but always ended up being drawn to McInnis, whose family still runs the business, many years after his death .

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Ferries carry passengers to and from Granville Island on Friday, June 24, 2022.
Ferries carry passengers to and from Granville Island on Friday, June 24, 2022. Photo by Jason Payne /PNG

It is a unique work.

“I was driving the ferry when this gray whale came up the creek in 2010,” Patterson recalled.

“It was a bit strange. You don’t know what you are looking at. I saw him take a breath, he exhaled and there was a bit of a spout, but my mind didn’t quite process it as I watched him. While I’m thinking, it comes right at me, and I go right there.

He’s laughing.

“The gears were turning very slowly. Eventually I realized what it was, but by then it was going under the boat. I had no chance of taking evasive action or anything like that.

“Once the word got out, people were on the bridges, looking down and all the way to the seawall. He walked up the creek and the police and aquarium staff tried to escort him out of the creek. We had to stop the ferry service while this was happening. As soon as they left, he came back again.

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The electric ferries were quite small and have been removed. The False Creek fleet now includes two types of diesel-powered ferry, including a 20ft built in Port Hardy and designed by Jay Benford, “a fairly famous naval architect”.

The new Fleet Edition was built by West Bay Shipyard in Delta and is slightly larger (22 feet).

“It’s a little easier to get in and out, there’s a little more headroom,” he said. “A little more stable and more stable.”

Business slows down in the winter, when it’s mostly locals, but can reach 2,000 passengers per hour in the summer, when it’s 70% tourists. The ferries can carry 12 passengers each and tickets range from $3.50 for a one-way ticket to $16 for a day pass. You can also charter a ferry for a private trip, like Bono did when U2 were rehearsing in Vancouver a few years ago.

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“We have nine different stops,” he said. “Our westernmost stop is Kits Maritime Museum and in English Bay at Sunset Beach, (easternmost is) up the creek to Science World.”

This prompts his standard joke: “Up the creek, no paddle required.”

jmackie@postmedia.com

Ferries carry passengers to and from Granville Island on Friday, June 24, 2022.
Ferries carry passengers to and from Granville Island on Friday, June 24, 2022. Photo by Jason Payne /PNG

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Fire Island Ferries to raise fares https://pccmph.com/fire-island-ferries-to-raise-fares/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:20:45 +0000 https://pccmph.com/fire-island-ferries-to-raise-fares/

Fire Island Ferries, Inc. – Bay Shore Marina’s ferry service – recently announced an increase in all ferry, freight and water taxi fares starting June 25.

The service includes trips between Bay Shore and the following areas of Fire Island: Kismet, Saltaire, Fair Harbor, Dunewood, Atlantic, Ocean Beach, Seaview and Ocean Bay Park.

A one-way adult ticket will drop from $11 to $13; a $21 adult round-trip ticket will now cost $25.

The other price increases for summer 2022 are as follows, according to the Fire Island Ferries website:

  • The 40-trip adult booklet has gone from $330 to $442.
  • One-way tickets for seniors, military, and disabled have been reduced from $10 to $12.
  • The one-way child ticket has been reduced from $6 to $7.
  • The round-trip child ticket has been reduced from $11 to $13.
  • The booklet of 40 trips for children has gone from $165 to $221.
  • The worker’s 40-ride booklet now costs $350.

In addition to the ferry, water taxi fares are also higher. They are defined as follows:

Crossbay in season

  • Before 9 p.m., $200 for the first six rates/reservations and $17.50 for each additional rate/reservation.
    • The original price was $190 for the first six fares/bookings and $15 for each additional booking.
  • After 9 p.m., $235 for the first six rates/reservations and $17.50 for each additional rate/reservation.
    • Old rates after 9 p.m. were $225 and $15 for each additional rate.

Crossbay out of season

  • Before 9 p.m., $250 for the first six rates/reservations and $17.50 for each additional rate/reservation.
    • Previously listed at $195 for the first six rates/reservations and $15 for each additional rate/reservation.
  • After 9 p.m., $275 for the first six rates/reservations and $17.50 for each additional rate/reservation.

Lateral water taxi service varies by community. To see the full list of updated prices on the Fire Island Water Taxi website.

The same applies to freight rates, which vary by item. Click here for the updated list of charges.

keep following GreaterFireIsland.com for updates.

Top: File photo of a Fire Island Ferry docked at Ocean Beach.

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Korn Ferry’s royalty revenue increases 29.9% in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year, growth across all lines of business https://pccmph.com/korn-ferrys-royalty-revenue-increases-29-9-in-the-fourth-quarter-of-the-fiscal-year-growth-across-all-lines-of-business/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:25:47 +0000 https://pccmph.com/korn-ferrys-royalty-revenue-increases-29-9-in-the-fourth-quarter-of-the-fiscal-year-growth-across-all-lines-of-business/

June 22, 2022

Korn Ferry’s (NYSE: KFY) commission revenue increased 29.9% year-over-year during the company’s fourth fiscal quarter ended April 30. acquisitions of the Lucas group and the Patina Solutions group.

(in thousands of dollars) Q4 2022 Q4 2021 % change % constant currency
Fee receipts $721,139 $555,151 29.9% 33%
Expenses reimbursed $5,864 $2,243 161.4%
Total income $727,003 $557,394 30.4%
Net revenue $93,059 $66,751 39.4%

CEO Gary Burnison said he was pleased with Korn Ferry‘s results and noted that skilled labor shortages are predicted for years to come, regardless of economic activity.

“The world and our customers have entered a new reality – a transitional era of Covid in which there will be a competition not only for growth, but also for relevance and profitability,” Burnison said.

Royalty revenue by segment

(in thousands of dollars) Q4 2022 Q4 2021 % change % constant currency
Consultant $173,944 $153,573 13.3% 16%
Digital $89,521 $80,499 11.2% 15%
Total executive search $244,199 $200,728 21.7% 23%
RPO and professional research $213,475 $120,351 77.4% 81%

Executive search revenue growth was driven by an increase in new search engagements and an increase in average fee-per-search revenue. Growth occurred in all regions with the largest increase in North America.

The board’s revenue growth was driven by “significant client workforce transformation initiatives” which included diversity, equity and inclusion as well as environmental and social governance initiatives.

Commission revenue from Korn Ferry’s “digital” segment reflected growth in total rewards and leadership development offerings.

In the RPO and Professional Search segment, RPO revenue increased 43% and Professional Search commission revenue increased 142%, driven by acquisition momentum. Professional research engagements also increased, and the weighted average fee charged per engagement also increased, the company said.

Korn Ferry said it completed its acquisition of Patina Solutions in the fourth quarter.

Executive Recruitment Fee Revenue by Geography

(in thousands of dollars) Q4 2022 Q4 2021 % change
North America $156,232 $130,790 19.5%
Europe, Middle East and Africa $49,502 $41,253 20.0%
Asia Pacific $30,211 $23,604 28.0%
Latin America $8,254 $5,081 62.4%

Fourth quarter net income increased 39.4%.

Annual results

(in thousands of dollars) FISCAL YEAR 2022 FISCAL YEAR 2021 % change % constant currency
Fee receipts $2,626,718 $1,810,047 45.1% 45%
Expenses reimbursed $16,737 $9,899 69.1%
Total income $2,643,455 $1,819,946 45.2%
Net revenue $330,845 $115,562 186.3%

Tips

Korn Ferry expects royalty revenue of between $680 million and $710 million for the first fiscal quarter.

Stock price and market capitalization

Korn Ferry shares rose 4.94% to $56.50 at 12:37 p.m. EST; they were 10.62% above their 52-week low, according to FT.com. The company had a market cap of $2.90 billion.

]]> Barton overtakes Ferry to even save | News, Sports, Jobs https://pccmph.com/barton-overtakes-ferry-to-even-save-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 06:44:27 +0000 https://pccmph.com/barton-overtakes-ferry-to-even-save-news-sports-jobs/

TL Photo/KIM NORTH Barton second baseman Dylan Busby waits for a pitch as Martins Ferry‘s Chase Goff tries to steal a base during the second inning of Monday night’s Ohio Valley Baseball League game at- above the purple city. Goff was absent and the Braves won 5-3.

MARTINS FERRY — Barton hit the .500 mark behind a pitching performance from Tyler Blomquist in a 5-3 victory over Martins Ferry in Ohio Valley Baseball League action at Purple City on Monday night .

Blomquist, a former St. Clairsville High, Post 159 and West Liberty ace, hadn’t taken the mound since last summer, but he showed minor effects from the layoff. He struck out six, walked a half-dozen and allowed seven hits on a road outing. He threw 116 pitches, including 69 strikes.

With the win, the Braves (7-7) are keeping pace for the coveted second or third place finish in the five-team league as the regular season draws to a close. Meanwhile, the River Dogs (4-11) remain competitive.

“I didn’t feel bad there, a little rusty but it felt good to be back on the mound,” said Blomquist. “I had to make a few throws there a few times. It’s been a while since I’ve had to do this, but it was fun.

Barton’s veteran coach Billy Timko couldn’t have been more proud of Blomquist’s efforts.

“For his first outing this year, he pitched really well,” Timko said. “I really didn’t want him to stay that long, but he said he had it, so I let him go.

“With Tyler going the distance I haven’t had to use my bullpen so Gaeten (Sinisgalli) is ready for Wednesday,” he added from the Braves’ game against the Wheeling Pioneers at West Liberty.

Barton scored three times on a single hit in the top of the second. Sinisgalli drew a tee shot and Zac Taylor’s sacrifice bunt was thrown wild first. After both runners had a double steal, Matt Fouty walked to charge the bases. Aaron Marovich hit an 0-1 pitch from Dom Brncic across the right side of the infield as Sinisgalli and Taylor scored. With one out, Jacob Rosnick failed as Fouty headed home.

Martins Ferry broke the ice late in the fourth with a point, but the damage could have been worse.

Kobe Hill threw a right single, and after a line out, Hill was caught stealing by Taylor, the second base runner he downed in the game.

“Zac has a gun over there,” Timko said of the former Brooke star and current Otterbein University squad member. “Not many guys can run on his arm.”

Mason Goddard drew a later walk and Chase Goff beat a bouncer to third who was thrown wildly as Goodard went to third and Goff to second. With the count 3-0 over Brendan Baire, Timko opted to put him in to charge the goals. Cody Hamilton’s infield single allowed Goddard to score, but Blomquist earned a late inning strikeout to leave the bases full.

The Braves scored an unearned run in the top of the fifth as the River Dogs committed two errors, making it 4-1.

Gian Degenova ripped a double on the third base line with two outs late in the fifth that chased Hill for a 4-2 read, but Degenova was caught trying the third to end the inning.

Barton added an insurance run in the top of the seventh on Sinisgalli’s sacrificial volley to center right. Nick Scott scored on the play for a 5-2 margin.

The River Dogs scored once in their last at bat, but left the bases loaded.

“We didn’t put in much at the start and we gave up some early runs that we shouldn’t have had,” Martins Ferry manager Andy Sutak lamented. “We just need that big hit when we have runners, but we just can’t get it. This is the story of our season.

Brncic worked in the seventh before making way for Jackson Romshack. Brncic struck out five, walked three and gave up seven hits.

“Dom threw a good game. He kept us in the game. He really did. Sutak praised.

IN ANOTHER action, Maynard lost a 4-2 decision to the Wheeling Pioneers.



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]]> Letters: Time to ditch the government’s grandiose and expensive ferry strategy and switch to catamarans https://pccmph.com/letters-time-to-ditch-the-governments-grandiose-and-expensive-ferry-strategy-and-switch-to-catamarans/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:00:01 +0000 https://pccmph.com/letters-time-to-ditch-the-governments-grandiose-and-expensive-ferry-strategy-and-switch-to-catamarans/ I NOTE your report on the latest state of the ferry crisis (“Documents reveal Scotland ferry crisis will cost £1.5bn to solve”, June 12).

An immediate improvement would result from the purchase of the Pentalina from Pentland Ferries, at a very modest price of £5-7 million. Given the average age of Calmac’s fleet, the idea that a ship launched 14 years ago is too old is laughable. The Pentalina is perfectly suited to the tracks of Arran or Mull, both crossings of less than an hour. She carries around 14 crew but without crew accommodation and a large catering staff, which are not needed on such short journeys. With two shore-based crew shifts, an 18-hour-a-day service could be achieved similar to that provided by Western Ferries at Dunoon. With crew costs per crossing halved, fuel costs reduced by around two-thirds and frequency doubled, service could be significantly improved at lower cost.

Building bigger and bigger ships that require huge infrastructure costs is not the answer. Ports aren’t getting any bigger, and while these large ships can make the passage in all weathers, docking safely is another matter. The maneuverability of the catamarans allows Pentland Ferries to operate a lucrative service in the worst stretch of water in the British Isles with minimal weather-related disruption.

Second, is there a contingency plan in case the Glen Sannox and Hull 802 is further delayed, or perhaps, as has been suggested, is not completed or not accepted by CMAL? Given the long lead times, most, if not all, equipment warranties will expire, resulting in increased costs and/or reduced reliability. If CMAL sought to refuse acceptance, it is likely that the Scottish Government, in order to save face, would force acceptance just as it forced the order of the FMEL ships without guarantees.

Third, we won’t have to wait until 2030 to solve this problem. The usual lead time for the supply of a bespoke vessel commissioned by CMAL is approximately five to six years. Pentland Ferries’ 98-car Alfred catamaran was delivered around 18 months after ordering at a cost of around £17m, maybe £20m today because these designs already exist. How many Alfreds for £500m? A policy change could solve the problem in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost.

There are so many questions to explore. Why are the Scottish Government and Transport Scotland giving CMAL so much leeway to pursue grand and expensive plans? Why did the ferry advisory committee not meet for about two and a half years before it was disbanded? Was the advice given not to the liking of Transport Scotland and CMAL? The survey more than two years ago described the CMAL as not fit for purpose and questioned its relevance. At the end of the day, it’s about the management of taxpayers’ money, and that management has been lavish.

J Patrick Maclean, Oban.

REDUCE OUR LOSSES

WITH the seemingly endless failures of Ferguson Marine, Calmac, CMAL, Caledonian MacBrayne and the “arm’s length owner”, the Scottish Government, isn’t it time to reflect and reclaim some of the shipbuilding reputation once proud of Scotland?

Instead of spending more money on the two hulks from the Port Glasgow shipyard, scrap them and get some money back. On second thought, salvage everything worth salvaging from the boats: two out-of-warranty motors, more than a few short lengths of copper wiring, and more. Then drag the carcasses down the middle of the Clyde and plant them upright, Antony Gormley style, next to the MV Captayanis, aka the Sugar Boat, all to show that common sense has finally prevailed by stopping wasting more funding on them, and as a reminder of one of the follies of the SNP during his tenure.

Take back the £20 million allocated to the upcoming “once in a lifetime referendum” fund, donate £500,000 towards the annual running costs of PS Waverly, £500,000 towards the works and running of the PS Maid of the Loch (both built at the AJ Inglis yard) and an additional £500.00 for the works and running costs of the SS Sir Walter Scott (built by Denny at Dumbarton. The remaining £18.5 million, and any additional earnings , can be paid to the NHS.

George Dale, Beth.

THERE IS NO MANDATE

NICOLA Sturgeon’s rationale for her ‘uncontested tenure’ is the result of the 2021 election at Holyrood. She forgets that she failed to secure a majority of MSPs and was forced to face the Greens, with all their baggage, to achieve the desired result. She is now using this as her main weapon to force another referendum on independence.

There is a huge flaw in his argument. Holyrood failed to elect a single Green MSP by first past the post and to make matters worse the pro-Union parties won 32% of the vote, the SNP and Greens 31% and a whopping 37% of the electorate didn’t vote at all. Given this, plus the fact that among those who did not vote, it can reasonably be assumed that many are pro-Union given the turnout and voting in 2014, then Ms Sturgeon’s main claim of a democratic majority falls at the very first hurdle.

The Supreme Court has nothing to do with it. It’s already over.

Dr Gerald Edwards, Glasgow.

SUCH A WASTE OF MONEY

I note with interest and disgust that despite massive cuts across all sectors of the Scottish economy and society, the SNP is spending £20million on a new campaign for independence.

It’s such a waste of money. That £20million could be better spent on things like education, providing textbooks, pencils, musical instruments and teachers – or new ferries that don’t go over budget or that are in dry dock because they can’t operate due to even more wasted money.

The SNP complains that Scotland has a huge deficit. It does. However, it is not how much the SNP complains that Westminster is to blame. How can he say that when he has been in power for over 14 years and the situation is still the same? It does not mean anything.

Just think what railway workers, teachers, police and council workers and anyone you can think of could do with £20million.

Valerie Stewart, East Kilbride.

THE TRADE UNION PARTIES ARE GROUPING UP

ANDY Maciver is absolutely right about his bleak prognosis for the Scottish Conservatives if they don’t form a new political party, separate from the English Tories – just as the Welsh Conservative Party predicts (“Douglas Ross’s only option is to create a new party”, June 12). The Scottish Conservatives are judged not only on the misbehavior of Westminster governance, but also on their policy (muscular unionism) of distant London ministers taking precedence over Holyrood.

Where I disagree with Mr Maciver is with his assertion that no other party in Holyrood would ‘work with the Tories, let alone support a Tory government’. We can already see in local government a putative British nationalist coalition (Labour, Tories and LibDems). I have no doubt that these parties would form a Red/Blue/Yellow coalition government if they could somehow garner enough elected officials. But without straying from drag anchors like Boris Johnson and Sir Keir Starmer, the dial looks stuck.

GR Weir, Ochiltree.

PROBLEMS WITH THE BREXIT DEFICIT

The use of the mantra of modernization seduces an audience delighted with the hope of improving its future economic prospects.

It carries much the same traction as the PM’s sunny highland reference to paint a picture of a rosier future. But beneath these two siren songs lurk hidden dangers that threaten workers’ well-being and economic prospects.

The story of the sunny highlands now returns as the achievement of Brexit has traded our trading relationship with the single market, where we once enjoyed preferential treatment, for the uncertainties of trying to strike deals with partners alternatives to fill the gaps left by skipping ship from EU.

Modernization usually leads to more mechanization and downsizing. This is very often accompanied by the generalization of lighter regulations, creating an increase in temporary contracts and a reduction in job security.

We are seeing these two developments in the Brexit deficit and the standoff between rail companies and their workforces.

No wonder we are nostalgic for what we had.

Denis Bruce, Bishopbriggs.

MISS A BEAT WITH ROLLING STONES

Reading the Spotlight article on the Rolling Stones’ current tour (“The Stones Deliver Certainty in a Chaotic World,” June 12), I was disappointed and surprised at the lack of mention of their new drummer. He was in the photo, but that seemed to be the extent of your acknowledgment of his existence.

I read the article several times just in case I missed a mention, but no. I would have thought that landing the role of the Rolling Stones’ new drummer, replacing the legendary Charlie Watts, would merit at least a line or two, but not even a name check. Why?

Gail Herrigan, Glasgow.

POPULAR OVERLOAD

IN the heated debate over climate change, no one mentions the elephant in the room. Today, the world population is eight billion. A hundred years ago it was 1.9 billion. Then three billion in 1960 and 6.1 billion in 2000. By 2050 it could be 9.8 billion and 11.2 billion by 2100. Politicians spending trillions of pounds trying to cut gas emissions greenhouse as the population grows is like trying to empty a bath with a teaspoon while the tap is still running.

Clark Cross, Linlithgow.

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ABB will lead the project for the largest Shore-to-Ship solution in France https://pccmph.com/abb-will-lead-the-project-for-the-largest-shore-to-ship-solution-in-france/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 17:41:00 +0000 https://pccmph.com/abb-will-lead-the-project-for-the-largest-shore-to-ship-solution-in-france/

ABB’s shore connection technology enables emission-free stays for ferries and cruise ships at the port of Toulon

Posted on June 13, 2022 4:17 PM by

The Maritime Executive







[By: ABB]


The port of Toulon, which welcomes more than 1.6 million ferry and cruise passengers each year, has committed to ABB Shore Connection technology at a key stage in its sustainable development approach.


With around 1,300 annual calls by ferries and cruise ships right in the heart of the city, the port of Toulon plays an important role in developing the region’s attractiveness for business and tourists. The port is also at the heart of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Region’s “Zero Smoke Stopovers” plan (South PACA Region), which aims to electrify the quays of Toulon, Marseille and Nice to allow emissions-free stays. for ships1.


Shore-to-ship electrical connections allow ships to turn off diesel generators during port calls. For shipowners, this means savings on fuel and maintenance costs while switching to cleaner, more sustainable energy. Cruise and ferry passengers, as well as local residents, not only benefit from cleaner air, but also from less noise and vibration generated when ships are docked.


“Toulon is the first Mediterranean port to supply all of its quays. This is an innovative project based on an intelligent energy flow management system with a unique energy mix. With the support of ABB as well as the South PACA Region and our partners, we are significantly improving air quality in the port, while maintaining activity. The shore-ship electrical connection will eliminate more than 80% of polluting emissions. It will also save 9,000 hours of diesel-powered ships per year. For the city of Toulon’s ferry activity alone, this represents a reduction in sulfur emissions equivalent to that of 50,000 cars in one year,” said Hubert Falco, President of the Toulon Provence Méditerranée Metropolis.


“Technically, this project develops a new intelligent smart grid electricity network using digital technology to manage the energy flows from several interconnected sources. The infrastructure makes it possible to optimize overall energy efficiency while limiting the carbon footprint”, specifies Frédéric Mestivier, designer and technical director of the electricity project of the Toulon Provence Méditerranée Metropolis.


ABB is leading the consortium selected to manage and execute this turnkey project, which is scheduled for commissioning in 2023. The ABB solution will be able to supply enough power to cover the needs of three ferries calling at the port simultaneously, or of a cruise ship. The ships will have the possibility of electrical connections at 50 or 60 Hz. As part of the consortium, Eiffage Construction will carry out the civil engineering work and Fauché will be responsible for installing and connecting the equipment.


Thanks to the innovative design implemented by the Métropoles Toulon Provence Méditerranée, the system implemented with ABB equipment will have the ability to automatically adjust energy consumption? mix to power ships via the local electricity grid (Enedis), with solar energy produced from a photovoltaic shelter, as well as an energy storage system made up of lithium batteries. The system will help smooth out peaks in consumption while allowing storage of excess solar power generation. It may also use other renewable energy sources such as fuel cells, as they become available.


“We are honored to have been selected by Métropole Toulon Provence Méditerranée to work on this innovative project,” said Jyri Jusslin, Head of Service, ABB Marine & Ports. “We congratulate the Toulon authorities for seizing this opportunity. It paves the way for a more sustainable future with smart systems that already exist today.


Sustainable transport, including maritime and river transport, will play an important role in the objective set by France to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 in accordance with the climate plan announced in 2017.


Worldwide, ferries carry around four billion passengers and 370 million vehicles every year, according to the trade association Interferry2. The International Maritime Organization has adopted a strategy to reduce annual emissions by at least 40% by 2030 and 70% by 2050, and passenger transport is under pressure to meet these targets.


As a leader in electric navigation and smart port technology, ABB offers complete shore connection solutions including state-of-the-art infrastructure both on shore and on board ships. ABB’s shore-to-ship power technology has already been integrated by more than 50 ports around the world to support the goal of reducing emissions and efforts towards sustainable shipping.



The products and services described in this press release are not endorsed by The Maritime Executive.



]]> Four crossings canceled due to ‘staff shortage’: BC Ferries – BC https://pccmph.com/four-crossings-canceled-due-to-staff-shortage-bc-ferries-bc/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 21:59:34 +0000 https://pccmph.com/four-crossings-canceled-due-to-staff-shortage-bc-ferries-bc/

BC Ferries has canceled four Sunday crossings between Tsawwassen and Swartz Bay, citing a staff shortage as the cause.

The decision to cancel the crossings is made when BC Ferries has exhausted all options to find a replacement crew, according to the company.

“We require a specific number of crew members on board the ship to ensure the safety of our passengers in the unlikely event of an emergency and to comply with Transport Canada regulations,” said staff. BC Ferries.

“Our customer service center will contact customers with reservations on these canceled crossings to let them know if we have space available to accommodate them on another crossing later today, or if their reservation should be cancelled.”

Read more:

BC Ferries offers hiring bonuses amid ‘crew shortage’, canceled sailings

The story continues under the ad

The following crossings have been cancelled:

  • 4:00 p.m. departure from Tsawwassen
  • 6:00 p.m. departing from Swartz Bay
  • 8:00 p.m. departure from Tsawwassen
  • 10:00 p.m. from Swartz Bay

BC Ferries had to cancel four sailings last Tuesday and four last Monday, citing “crew challenges”.

Another service is available via the Tsawwassen, Duke Point and Horseshoe Bay, Departure Bay routes, according to BC Ferries.


Click to play video: 'BC Ferries fined over $600,000 in 2020 employee death'







BC Ferries fined over $600,000 in 2020 in employee death


BC Ferries fined over $600,000 in 2020 in employee death

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Ferries from Weymouth to the Channel Islands ‘could return later this year’ https://pccmph.com/ferries-from-weymouth-to-the-channel-islands-could-return-later-this-year/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 13:33:17 +0000 https://pccmph.com/ferries-from-weymouth-to-the-channel-islands-could-return-later-this-year/

The return of ferry services from Weymouth appears to have taken another step forward, with trial services potentially returning this autumn. A cross-Channel service was halted in 2015 when Condor Ferries moved services to Poole due to its £50million vessel being too big for Weymouth Port and multi-million port improvements needed.

A restarted ferry service has been rumored for several years, and a plan to determine whether a return of the cross-Channel service was viable was launched by Weymouth City Council in June 2021. Further speculation was generated when the CEO of Condor, John Napton, held a meeting with board officials last November.

Weymouth City Council has confirmed it is “liaising” with Dorset Council on a formal proposal, with little information released so far. It is, however, suggested in the proposals that a trial service could potentially start later this year in the fall. It is understood that full details of the revised ferry service will be released next week. Dorset Council has also been approached to comment on the plans.

Read more – Failed Weymouth Peninsula plans and what could happen next to the site

If ferry service is restored to Weymouth it will generate a big boost in the area as the loss of services has cost the seaside town economy £750,000 a year. Weymouth City Council is meeting on Wednesday June 1 to discuss plans to bring the ferry service back to the town, where a meeting stressed it would be a ‘major boost for Weymouth residents’ and create skilled jobs and apprenticeships, would increase commerce for hotels, restaurants, bars and shops, as well as “creating investment opportunities in Weymouth”.

The report also notes that there is overwhelming support that a new ferry service would create leisure and travel opportunities for locals, as well as school children who may visit Guernsey to learn more about its role in the Second World War, its culture and history.

The full council minutes say discussions have been held with Guernsey officials and a ‘large ferry company’ and that there will be ‘between one and two crossings per week during the summer months’. A statement from the minutes of the meeting read: “Over the past two years there have been discussions initially with the States of Guernsey and more recently a major ferry company.



Weymouth Harbor

“Weymouth City Council have been informed of the developments and have supported these discussions by potentially bringing a ferry service back to Weymouth. Further investigations have now been completed and this document is to serve as a formal proposal to Dorset Council. A business case, prepared by the ferry company, is being sent under separate, confidential cover to Weymouth Councillors.

“If ferry service were restored, it is likely that there would be between one and two crossings per week during the summer months.

The report says that sea trials will take place in the autumn of this year, the restored ferry service would be included as part of the redevelopment of the peninsula and the port.

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]]> ABB signs ‘Shore-to-Ship’ power agreement for cruises and ferries in port https://pccmph.com/abb-signs-shore-to-ship-power-agreement-for-cruises-and-ferries-in-port/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:15:28 +0000 https://pccmph.com/abb-signs-shore-to-ship-power-agreement-for-cruises-and-ferries-in-port/

The port of Toulon, which welcomes more than 1.6 million ferry and cruise passengers each year, has committed to ABB Shore Connection technology at a key stage in its sustainable development approach.

With around 1,300 annual calls by ferries and cruise ships right in the heart of the city, the port of Toulon plays an important role in developing the region’s attractiveness for business and tourists. The port is also at the heart of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Region’s “Zero Smoke Stopovers” plan (South PACA Region), which aims to electrify the quays of Toulon, Marseille and Nice to allow emissions-free stays. for ships.

Shore-to-ship electrical connections allow ships to turn off diesel generators during port calls. For shipowners, this means savings on fuel and maintenance costs while switching to cleaner, more sustainable energy. Cruise and ferry passengers, as well as local residents, not only benefit from cleaner air, but also from less noise and vibration generated when ships are docked.

“The dock-ship electrical connection will eliminate more than 80% of polluting emissions. It will also save 9,000 hours of diesel-powered ships per year. For the city of Toulon’s ferry activity alone, this represents a reduction in sulfur emissions equivalent to that of 50,000 cars in one year,” said Hubert Falco, President of the Toulon Provence Méditerranée Metropolis.

“Technically, this project develops a new intelligent smart grid electricity network using digital technology to manage the energy flows from several interconnected sources. The infrastructure makes it possible to optimize overall energy efficiency while limiting the carbon footprint”, specifies Frédéric Mestivier, designer and technical director of the electricity project of the Toulon Provence Méditerranée Metropolis.

ABB is leading the consortium selected to manage and execute this turnkey project, which is scheduled to go live in 2023.

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